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a priori

a pri·o·ri
A a

Transcription

    • US Pronunciation
    • US IPA
    • [ey prahy-awr-ahy, -ohr-ahy, ey pree-awr-ee, -ohr-ee, ah pree-awr-ee, -ohr-ee]
    • /ˌeɪ praɪˈɔr aɪ, -ˈoʊr aɪ, ˌeɪ priˈɔr i, -ˈoʊr i, ˌɑ priˈɔr i, -ˈoʊr i/
    • US Pronunciation
    • US IPA
    • [ey prahy-awr-ahy, -ohr-ahy, ey pree-awr-ee, -ohr-ee, ah pree-awr-ee, -ohr-ee]
    • /ˌeɪ praɪˈɔr aɪ, -ˈoʊr aɪ, ˌeɪ priˈɔr i, -ˈoʊr i, ˌɑ priˈɔr i, -ˈoʊr i/

Definitions of a priori words

  • adjective a priori An a priori argument, reason, or probability is based on an assumed principle or fact, rather than on actual observed facts. 3
  • adjective a priori A priori is also an adverb. 3
  • adjective a priori relating to or involving deductive reasoning from a general principle to the expected facts or effects 3
  • adjective a priori known to be true independently of or in advance of experience of the subject matter; requiring no evidence for its validation or support 3
  • noun a priori from cause to effect or from a generalization to particular instances; deductive or deductively 3
  • noun a priori based on theory, logic, fixed rules or forms, etc. instead of on experience or experiment 3

Information block about the term

Origin of a priori

First appearance:

before 1645
One of the 44% oldest English words
1645-55; < Latin: literally, from the one before. See a-4, prior1

Historical Comparancy

Parts of speech for A priori

noun
adjective
verb
adverb
pronoun
preposition
conjunction
determiner
exclamation

a priori popularity

A pretty common term. Usually people know it’s meaning, but prefer to use a more spread out synonym. About 53% of English native speakers know the meaning and use word.
This word is included in each student's vocabulary. Most likely there is at least one movie with this word in the title.

a priori usage trend in Literature

This diagram is provided by Google Ngram Viewer

Synonyms for a priori

adv a priori

  • derivable — to receive or obtain from a source or origin (usually followed by from).
  • presumptive — affording ground for presumption: presumptive evidence.
  • rational — agreeable to reason; reasonable; sensible: a rational plan for economic development.
  • supposed — assumed as true, regardless of fact; hypothetical: a supposed case.
  • theoretical — of, relating to, or consisting in theory; not practical (distinguished from applied).

See also

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