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a posteriori

a pos·te·ri·o·ri
A a

Transcription

    • US Pronunciation
    • US IPA
    • [ey po-steer-ee-awr-ahy, -ohr-ahy, -awr-ee, -ohr-ee]
    • /ˌeɪ pɒˌstɪər iˈɔr aɪ, -ˈoʊr aɪ, -ˈɔr i, -ˈoʊr i/
    • US Pronunciation
    • US IPA
    • [ey po-steer-ee-awr-ahy, -ohr-ahy, -awr-ee, -ohr-ee]
    • /ˌeɪ pɒˌstɪər iˈɔr aɪ, -ˈoʊr aɪ, -ˈɔr i, -ˈoʊr i/

Definitions of a posteriori words

  • adjective a posteriori relating to or involving inductive reasoning from particular facts or effects to a general principle 3
  • adjective a posteriori derived from or requiring evidence for its validation or support; empirical; open to revision 3
  • noun a posteriori from effect to cause, or from particular instances to a generalization; inductive or inductively 3
  • noun a posteriori based on observation or experience; empirical 3
  • adjective a posteriori from particular instances to a general principle or law; based upon actual observation or upon experimental data: an a posteriori argument that derives the theory from the evidence. Compare a priori (def 1). 1
  • adjective a posteriori not existing in the mind prior to or independent of experience. Compare a priori (def 2). 1

Information block about the term

Origin of a posteriori

First appearance:

before 1615
One of the 41% oldest English words
1615-25; < Latin: literally, from the one behind. See a-4, posterior

Historical Comparancy

Parts of speech for A posteriori

noun
adjective
verb
adverb
pronoun
preposition
conjunction
determiner
exclamation

a posteriori popularity

A pretty common term. Usually people know it’s meaning, but prefer to use a more spread out synonym. About 39% of English native speakers know the meaning and use word.
According to our data about 58% of words is more used. This is a rare but used term. It occurs in the pages of specialized literature and in the speech of educated people.

a posteriori usage trend in Literature

This diagram is provided by Google Ngram Viewer

Synonyms for a posteriori

adv a posteriori

  • analytical — An analytical way of doing something involves the use of logical reasoning.
  • logical — according to or agreeing with the principles of logic: a logical inference.
  • practical — of or relating to practice or action: practical mathematics.
  • inducible — to lead or move by persuasion or influence, as to some action or state of mind: to induce a person to buy a raffle ticket.
  • inductive — of, relating to, or involving electrical induction or magnetic induction.

See also

Matching words

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