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abdicable

ab·di·cate
A a

Transcription

    • US Pronunciation
    • US IPA
    • [ab-di-keyt]
    • /ˈæb dɪˌkeɪt/
    • US Pronunciation
    • US IPA
    • [ab-di-keyt]
    • /ˈæb dɪˌkeɪt/

Definitions of abdicable word

  • verb without object abdicable to renounce or relinquish a throne, right, power, claim, responsibility, or the like, especially in a formal manner: The aging founder of the firm decided to abdicate. 1
  • verb with object abdicable to give up or renounce (authority, duties, an office, etc.), especially in a voluntary, public, or formal manner: King Edward VIII of England abdicated the throne in 1936. 1
  • noun abdicable Capable of being abdicated. (Late 19th century.). 1

Information block about the term

Origin of abdicable

First appearance:

before 1535
One of the 29% oldest English words
1535-45; < Latin abdicātus renounced (past participle of abdicāre), equivalent to ab- ab- + dicātus proclaimed (dic- (see dictum) + -ātus -ate1)

Historical Comparancy

Parts of speech for Abdicable

noun
adjective
verb
adverb
pronoun
preposition
conjunction
determiner
exclamation

abdicable popularity

A common word. It’s meaning is known to most children of preschool age. About 78% of English native speakers know the meaning and use the word.
Most Europeans know this English word. The frequency of it’s usage is somewhere between "mom" and "screwdriver".

Synonyms for abdicable

adjective abdicable

  • unwanted — not desired or needed; not wanted: My absence generated some unwanted attention.

See also

Matching words

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